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The war on glaucoma blindness takes place on three fronts: clinical care, teaching, and research.

The University of Iowa is at the forefront in all three of these arenas:

  • Providing the highest quality patient care with the latest technology – Learn More
  • Educating clinicians, researchers, students and patients – Learn More
  • Researching the causes of glaucoma and developing tools to aid in diagnosis and treatment – Learn More

Recent News

  • Mon, 01/11/2016 - 12:00

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    Dr. Lee Alward will be the Inaugural Recipient of the American Glaucoma Society Outstanding Educator Award in recognition of his extraordinary commitment to advancing glaucoma education to residents, fellows, and colleagues. He was selected by unanimous vote of the AGS Board of Directors. He will be formally recognized at the AGS Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale on March 5th, 2016.

    Besides his teaching in the clinic, at professional meetings, and in published articles, Dr. Alward has two educational websites each with an international following: http://gonioscopy.org and his most recent, Iowa Glaucoma Curriculum (http://curriculum.iowaglaucoma.org/) with more than 90 video clips and over 900 images.

  • Wed, 12/16/2015 - 11:30

    The Glaucoma Service is proud to welcome Dr. Jason Kam, who will join the University of Iowa's Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences next year.

  • Wed, 12/02/2015 - 12:30

    The Glaucoma Genetics lab has been awarded a grant from the National Eye Institute to study glaucoma caused by the TBK1 gene using a stem cell approach. The two year R21 grant entitled “TBK1-Related Glaucoma” will provide resources for the lab to collect skin cells from patients with low pressure glaucoma caused by a TBK1 gene defect. These skin cells will be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells which then will be used to produce cells that have features of the optic nerve - the tissue damaged by glaucoma. This study will allow Glaucoma Genetics Lab members to study the steps by which defects in the TBK1 gene damage the optic nerve and cause glaucoma. Moreover these studies will also lay the groundwork for testing new treatments for TBK1-related glaucoma as well as developing restorative optic nerve therapies.

    Key Investigators in this project are John Fingert and Budd Tucker and their post-doctoral fellow Tasneem Sharma.